I think of this as the sister site to the Orange Empire Railway Museum. It's one of the things that has made Campo an abstract treasure for me, along with the Motor Transport Museum, Freddy's Truck Farm, and Rick's Ranch.

The PSMRA, as they call themselves, is run entirely by volunteers, and has an informative website. Unfortunately, they're only open on the weekend.

I came here over a year ago, after spending most of the day at the Motor Transport Museum. I was tired, though, and didn't get out of it what I should have. So I returned on a beautiful day in February 2016, armed with my macro lens and fresh eyes.

A few of the abstracts are below. To see all of them, take a look at the Theme Portfolio.

In 1877, Victorio, a prominent Apache chief, led his band of warriors in various raids after leaving the wretched reservation they had been put in by the military. They came to the Rio Grande. The water was surging, and the women and children were afraid to cross. Victorio's sister, Lozen, hit the shoulder of her horse with her foot. The horse reared up, and Lozen and the horse went into the white water. The other members of the tribe, seeing her bravery, followed her to safety. Lozen was one of the most fearsome warriors, fighting beside Geronimo in the 1880's. She died in 1887 from tuberculosis, held as a prisoner of war.

In 1877, Victorio, a prominent Apache chief, led his band of warriors in various raids after leaving the wretched reservation they had been put in by the military. They came to the Rio Grande. The water was surging, and the women and children were afraid to cross. Victorio's sister, Lozen, hit the shoulder of her horse with her foot. The horse reared up, and Lozen and the horse went into the white water. The other members of the tribe, seeing her bravery, followed her to safety. Lozen was one of the most fearsome warriors, fighting beside Geronimo in the 1880's. She died in 1887 from tuberculosis, held as a prisoner of war.

See the rest of the images here.